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Crestor® (rosuvastatin calcium)



 

FAQs

Whether this is your first prescription for CRESTOR® (rosuvastatin calcium) or you’ve been taking it for a while, you probably have some questions. Take a look at a few common questions below to see if we can provide an answer.

Please remember that your doctor and pharmacist are the best sources of information on how cholesterol and plaque buildup relate to your specific situation.

Simply click on an option below to display a list of questions relating to that topic.

Cholesterol  |  

Plaque Buildup  |  

CRESTOR

Q. Where does cholesterol come from?
A. Cholesterol is produced by the liver. It's also found in foods high in (glossary term)saturated fat, like fatty meats, egg yolks, shellfish, and whole-milk dairy products.

Q. What makes cholesterol good or bad for your health?
A. Cholesterol travels through the bloodstream packaged inside a protein called a lipoprotein. There are two kinds of lipoproteins that are important when discussing cholesterol— (video)bad (LDL) cholesterol and (video)HDL (good) cholesterol. LDL cholesterol is considered "bad" because too much of it in your bloodstream can contribute to (video)plaque buildup in your (glossary term)arteries over time, also known as (video)atherosclerosis. HDL cholesterol is considered "good" because it helps return cholesterol to the liver, where it can be eliminated.

Q. How does LDL cholesterol contribute to health problems?
A. If you have too much LDL (bad) cholesterol circulating in your bloodstream, it can contribute to plaque buildup in your (video)arteries over time. For many people, this buildup starts in early adulthood and gets worse over time.

Q. How does my medical history impact the importance of managing my cholesterol?
A. Ask your doctor to be sure. If your doctor has told you that lowering your cholesterol is especially important for you, it could be because, in addition to high cholesterol, you have one or more additional factors that can contribute to plaque buildup in your arteries such as diabetes, high blood pressure, family history of early heart disease, age, obesity, and smoking.

Be sure to talk to your doctor about your personal medical history and how it affects your cholesterol.

Get a checklist to take to your doctor

Q. How do I find out what my cholesterol numbers mean?
A. The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) publishes general cholesterol guidelines, but based on your individual situation, your doctor may recommend something more specific. Take a look at the general NCEP guidelines for cholesterol and then talk to your doctor about your specific goals.

Q. How can I lower my cholesterol?
A. Living a healthy lifestyle, such as eating a diet that is low in saturated fats and cholesterol and getting at least 150 minutes of exercise each week, may help lower cholesterol. When diet and exercise alone aren't enough, your doctor may add a cholesterol-lowering medicine. Learn more about living a healthy lifestyle

Q. What is Plaque Buildup?
A. (video)Plaque Buildup in the (glossary term)arteries over time is a progressive disease called (video)atherosclerosis. One major cause is a high level of (video)bad (LDL) cholesterol. Other common risk factors, such as (glossary term)diabetes, (glossary term)high blood pressure, family history of early heart disease, age, obesity, or smoking, also play an important role. This plaque starts building up in our (video)arteries in early adulthood and gets worse over time, making cholesterol management important.

Q. Do I have other factors that increase the risk for plaque buildup over time?
A. You may know that high cholesterol plays a role in plaque buildup. However, other factors may increase your risk for it even more. Diabetes, high blood pressure, family history of early heart disease, age, obesity, or smoking, can also play a role. The good news is that you can manage some of these risk factors, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, and high cholesterol. Be sure to talk with your doctor about all the risk factors you may have. Get a checklist.

Q. What are some common lifestyle changes that can help in managing risk factors?
A. Most doctors agree that living a healthy lifestyle, such as eating a healthy, low-fat, low-cholesterol diet and getting regular exercise, is one of the most important things you can do. If you smoke, you should try to quit immediately. Last but not least, every plan should start by talking with your doctor. Learn more about living a healthy lifestyle.

Q. Can you tell me more about bruits, the ankle/brachial index, and how they are used to indicate plaque buildup over time?
A. One way your doctor can look for signs of plaque buildup is by placing a stethoscope on your neck, abdomen, or leg to listen to your arteries during a physical exam. Your doctor is listening for (glossary term)bruits (pronounced brew-ees), which are faint whooshing noises caused by the turbulence of blood rushing through restricted arteries.

Another way your doctor can check for signs of plaque buildup involves taking your blood pressure at the ankle and arm. This technique is called the (glossary term)ankle/brachial index.

Q. Can CRESTOR help slow the progression of atherosclerosis (plaque buildup)?
A. When diet and exercise alone aren’t enough, adding CRESTOR can help. CRESTOR, the same medicine that, along with diet, lowers LDL (bad) cholesterol up to 52% (at the 10-mg dose versus 7% with placebo), has been proven to slow the progression of atherosclerosis, as part of a treatment plan to lower cholesterol to goal. Ask your doctor if CRESTOR is right for you.

Q. Why did my doctor prescribe CRESTOR?
A. CRESTOR is prescribed for patients who need to manage high cholesterol and who have not had success managing it through diet and exercise alone. It can also help slow (video)plaque buildup in (glossary term)arteries, known as atherosclerosis, in adults with high cholesterol as part of a treatment plan to lower cholesterol to goal.

Q. How will I know if CRESTOR is working?
A. The only way to know whether CRESTOR is working is to have a follow-up (glossary term)fasting lipid profile, also known as a cholesterol test. Ask your doctor about when you should be retested.

Q. How soon should I expect results with CRESTOR?
A. You may see results for lowering your bad cholesterol as soon as 2-4 weeks after starting CRESTOR. People can have different responses to the same medicine, so your results may vary. Ask your doctor how soon you should return for a follow-up fasting lipid profile. Do not stop taking CRESTOR unless your doctor tells you to, or if you become pregnant. If you do become pregnant or are planning to become pregnant, talk to your doctor immediately.

Q. What are the most common side effects for CRESTOR?
A. CRESTOR can cause side effects in some people. The most common side effects may include headache, muscle aches, abdominal pain, weakness, and nausea.
Learn more about Side Effects for CRESTOR

Q. Is CRESTOR a substitute for a healthy diet and a regular exercise plan?
A. No. CRESTOR is prescribed when diet and exercise alone aren't enough to lower cholesterol. When taking CRESTOR, you should continue eating well and exercising. Follow a diet that's low in saturated fats and cholesterol and work on getting at least 150 minutes of exercise each week. Learn more about living a healthy lifestyle

Q. Do I still need to take CRESTOR when I reach my cholesterol goal?
A. Certain people may need to manage their cholesterol closely because of their medical history or other health concerns, and they need to take medications like CRESTOR as long as their doctor prescribes it to keep their cholesterol in check. It’s important to discuss your medical history and other health issues with your doctor, so that he or she can recommend the most appropriate treatment for you. Get a checklist

As with all prescription medications, it’s important to follow your doctor’s advice. Do not stop taking CRESTOR unless your doctor tells you to, or if you become pregnant. If you do become pregnant or are planning to become pregnant, talk to your doctor immediately.

Q. What should I do if I accidentally miss a dose of CRESTOR?
A. If you miss a dose of CRESTOR, take it as soon as you remember. However, do not take two doses of CRESTOR within 12 hours of each other.



Please see full Prescribing Information for CRESTOR
http://www.astrazeneca-us.com/cgi-bin/az_pi.cgi?product=crestor&country=us&popup=no

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.FDA.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

CRESTOR is licensed from SHIONOGI & CO, LTD, Osaka, Japan.



Saturated fat
Saturated fats are usually found in animal products, including fatty meat and dairy products, and are usually solid at room temperature. However, they are also found in some vegetable oils, including coconut and palm oils.
Artery or arteries
Arteries are relatively thick-walled blood vessels that carry oxygenated blood away from the heart to the rest of the body. They play a major role in the function of the cardiovascular system.
Diabetes
Diabetes is a disease in which either the body does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells do not effectively use the insulin produced. This causes above-normal blood sugar levels. Diabetes is a serious condition that can cause complications ranging from numbness to loss of vision to coma. It also significantly raises the risk for other variations such as stroke and heart disease. About 25.8 million Americans have diabetes.
High blood pressure
When the pressure at which blood is pumped through the arteries by the heart is above an average range, it is called high blood pressure, or hypertension. Blood pressure is recorded as two numbers—the systolic pressure (as the heart beats) over the diastolic pressure (as the heart relaxes).
Bruits
Pronounced “brew-ees,” bruits are the faint whooshing noise caused by the turbulence of blood rushing through restricted arteries. This is a common way for your doctor to look for signs of plaque buildup .
Ankle/brachial index
The ankle/brachial index is one way your doctor can diagnose plaque buildup in arteries or other vascular diseases. The test is done by measuring your blood pressure at the ankle and in the arm and dividing the systolic pressure in the ankle by the systolic pressure in the arm.
Fasting lipid profile
Also known as a cholesterol test, this is used to determine your levels of LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides. You will be asked to fast before you have a test to measure your blood cholesterol level. This means you have nothing to eat or drink—except for water—for 9 to 12 hours before the test.